Arts
Weekend Edition Saturday

Like A War Movie, But 'On A Planet Of Teenage Girls'

Sarah DeLappe's play The Wolves, which opens in New York on Monday, follows an elite soccer team of young women as it prepares for its own battles.

Weekend Edition Saturday

A Lady From 1881 Gets A New Portrait In 'Mrs. Osmond'

Man Booker Prize winner John Banville has written a sequel to Henry James' The Portrait Of A Lady. 'It was my initial foolhardiness and overweening pride that made me do it,' he says.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Kachka: The Word That Saved A Family During WWII And Inspired A Chef

It took until adulthood for Bonnie Morales, the daughter of immigrant Russian Jews, to appreciate the food of her childhood. Now she owns a popular Oregon restaurant and has released a new cookbook.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Caleb Landry Jones, 'Three Billboards' Salesman, Sees His 'Fat Face' On Screen

The modest young Texan — prominent in the new film Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri and other 2017 movies -- contemplates on his improvement as an actor.

'Bunk' Is Encyclopedic, Fascinating — And Frustrating

Kevin Young's new book puts forth an instantly convincing pairing of race and hoaxing — both a "fake thing pretending to be real." But he loses readers' trust with knotty, overly aphoristic writing.

All Things Considered

Lost Kitchen Restaurant Made Chef's Small Hometown A Dining Destination

One of the most coveted dinner experiences in America is a 40-seat restaurant in rural Maine where the chef prides herself in serving local food that diners recognize on the plate.

All Things Considered

Three Generations Of Actresses On How Ageism Affects Women In Hollywood

NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with actresses Tippi Hedren, Melanie Griffith and Dakota Johnson about how the opportunities for women in Hollywood have changed over the generations.

All Things Considered

In 'The Problem With Apu,' Hari Kondabolu Discusses South Asian Representation

Hari Kondabolu is a Brooklyn-based stand-up comedian, the child of Indian immigrants, and a big fan of The Simpsons. NPR's Elise Hu talks Kondabolu, whose new film The Problem With Apu delves into issues of South Asian representation.

All Things Considered

Music In 'Mudbound' Intended To Evoke Earth, Dirt And Mud

Afro-punk artist, Tamar-kali, makes her debut as a film composer in Mudbound, the new movie from director Dee Rees. Her background includes running a five-piece rock combo and a string sextet that fuses classical music and post-punk.

Fresh Air

Remembering Syndicated Gossip Columnist Liz Smith

Smith, who died Sunday, started her daily column for The New York Daily News in 1976. In 2000, she told Fresh Air: "I always held back from writing things that were intentionally hurtful."

The Modern, Mixed-Up Music Of Jazz Pianist Robert Glasper

June 10, 2016

Jazz pianist Robert Glasper remixes Miles Davis with modern hip-hop, soul and R&B. He joins us.

Week In The News: Hillary Makes History, Modi Meets Congress, Remembering 'The Greatest'

June 10, 2016

Hillary’s milestone. Obama meets Sanders. Mourning Muhammad Ali. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Huntington Theater Company Will Remain At BU Theatre

June 9, 2016

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh joined leaders of the Huntington Theatre Company to announce the company’s new home, which will be its old home.

Huntington Theatre Company Will Stay On Huntington Avenue

June 9, 2016
Huntington Theatre Company will not have to move from its home on the Avenue of the Arts. (Courtesy Boston University)

The Huntington Theatre Company announced Thursday that it will retain control over its longtime home, the BU Theatre.

The Hair Apparent—Stylist Adir Abergel Takes Over The Red Carpet

June 9, 2016

Abergel is the “it man” of hair, and joined us in our studio to discuss his hair philosophy and worldly inspirations.

What Price Convenience? Twin Peaks, And The Rewards Of Delayed Gratification

June 9, 2016

One evening every week, their anticipation in high gear, my parents turned off the living room lights… And I was told to leave the room.

Judy Collins Reflects On Addiction, Mental Health And Music

June 9, 2016
Singer and songwriter Judy Collins at WBUR. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Collins has long been known for voice, but she’s also been a long-time advocate on mental health issues.

It’s Good To Be A Fly On The Wall For These Remarkable ‘Dressing Room Stories’

June 9, 2016
Actor Alvin Epstein, seen in a 1997 production of "When the World Was Green (A Chef's Fable)" at the American Repertory Theater. (Courtesy American Repertory Theater)

Carolyn Clay reviews “Dressing Room Stories,” a collection of Alvin Estein’s reminiscences from a life in the theater.

Chuck Klosterman Asks The Right Question: What If We’re Wrong?

June 8, 2016
Author Chuck Klosterman (Courtesy of Kris Drake)

Chuck Klosterman’s new book, “But What If We’re Wrong?” discusses what our world will look like in the future.

A Soprano Song Of Searing Passion And Heartbreaking Honesty — Remembering Phyllis Curtin

June 8, 2016
Conductor Erich Leinsdorf acknowledges soloist Phyllis Curtin onstage at Tanglewood's Koussevitzky Music Shed in 1965. (Courtesy Heinz-Weissenstein/BSO)

Lloyd Schwartz, classical music critic for NPR’s “Fresh Air,” remembers soprano Phyllis Curtin, who died at her home in the Berkshires Sunday.

Boston Ballet Moves Forward With A Sure Step

June 8, 2016
Misa Kuranaga and Irlan Silva in Karole Armitage's "Bitches Brew." (Courtesy of Gene Schiavone/Boston Ballet)

Entering its 53rd season, the Boston Ballet is focusing on its future, with two recent announcements to entice its audience: a new work for 2017-’18 by Wayne McGregor and a five-year partnership with choreographer William Forsythe.

Why The ‘Roots’ Remake Matters (And What Stays The Same)

June 7, 2016

The recent remake of “Roots” on the History Channel makes important changes, Morehouse College’s Stephane Dunn argues. But it also holds true to the original story.

Africa, America And Yaa Gyasi's 'Homegoing'

June 7, 2016

One African sister is sold as slave to America. One stays in Africa. Celebrated debut novelist Yaa Gyasi compares their descendants’ stories with us. Plus, looking at the new “Roots” miniseries.

Ballet, Flamenco, Hip Hop — Dance For World Community And Social Change

June 7, 2016

More than 100 dance and social activism organizations will descend on Harvard Square as part of Dance for World Community, an event presented by José Mateo Ballet Theatre, in an effort to enact change.

Yaa Gyasi’s Debut Novel ‘Homegoing’ Weaves A Tale Of Trauma And Resilience

June 7, 2016
Cover of Yaa Gyasi's novel "Homegoing." (Courtesy Knopf Publishing)

Epic but intimate, “Homegoing” is less a novel than a chronological collage of individual lives over three centuries and seven generations — through enslavement and freedom.

Yale University Lab Provides A Peek Into The Future Of Music

June 6, 2016
Yale student Bobby Berry talks to Yale instructor Thibault Bertrand as he works on his musical instrument project, a rotating glass harp. (Ryan Caron King/WNPR)

If you could transport yourself to the 23rd century, what would the instruments look like?

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