Health
All Things Considered

Democratic Senator Urges Trump To 'Do More Than Talk' On Opioid Crisis

Sen. Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire addressed the opioid problem in her state for several years as governor. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with Hassan about President Trump's opioid plans.

All Things Considered

Missouri Rejects Federal Money In Order To Set Up Its Own Abortion Restrictions

Abortion is already heavily restricted in Missouri, but now the state is cutting more funding to organizations that provide abortions, even though it means rejecting millions of dollars from the feds.

All Things Considered

Trump Holds 'Listening Session' On Opioid Addiction

President Trump held a "listening session" on opioid addiction Wednesday, the beginning of what the White House says will be its effort to address a problem that resonated on the campaign trail.

6 Changes The Trump Administration Can Still Make To Obamacare

The Republican overhaul bill died, but the health care drama continues. There are lots of ways the administration can change the Affordable Care Act, without congressional approval.

HPV Vaccine Could Protect More People With Fewer Doses, Doctors Insist

In the U.S., there are about 39,000 cancers associated with the human papillomavirus each year. Doctors say the new HPV vaccine may help reduce the number of cases.

Morning Edition

Paralyzed Man Uses Thoughts To Control His Own Arm And Hand

A spinal injury severed the connection between Bill Kochevar's brain and everything below his shoulders. But technology has given him a new way to control one arm and hand.

All Things Considered

Through Regulation, Trump Could Dismantle Parts Of Obamacare

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Sarah Kliff of Vox about how Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price could dismantle parts of the Affordable Care Act through regulations.

India's Cities Have A Honking Big Noise Problem

They're so noisy that the Central Pollution Control Board is urging drivers not to honk needlessly — like that Uber driver who beeps along with the song on the radio.

All Things Considered

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

Scientists have assembled a lab system from living tissue that can replicate a woman's 28-day hormonal cycle. The goal is to use the system to find new ways to treat a host of women's health problems.

House GOP Says Health Care Fight Not Over, But Offers No Path Forward

House Republicans say they will try again to advance a bill to repeal and replace key pillars of President Obama's health care law.

Vermont Program Hailed As Model For Elder Healthcare

June 9, 2016
Karyn Crossman, a SASH coordinator pays a visit to 88-year-old Lloyd Piggrem, of Rutland. Piggrem is one of 100 clients Crossman works with through a statewide nonprofit that provides a variety of home-based support services. (Nina Keck/VPR)

The country’s medical costs are skyrocketing, with a nursing home stay running about $7,000 a month.

Teaching Young Men A Culture Of Consent

June 8, 2016
Students hold up a sign about rape at White Plaza during New Student Orientation on the Stanford University campus in 2015. (Tessa Ormenyi via AP)

In light of the Stanford rape case, we ask, what are we teaching young men about privilege and consent?

How Hispanics Fare Under The Affordable Care Act

June 8, 2016
Dr. Elisa Melendez-Eisman, the medical director of Clinica Tepeyac, with a patient. (Courtesy Clinica Tepeyac)

Hispanics have seen some of the biggest gains in health coverage under the ACA, but some disparities remain.

Treating Diabetes With Light

June 8, 2016

For many people with diabetes, needles are a blessing and a curse. But a Missouri researcher may have found a way to ease their plight with light.

Vermont Governor On FDA’s Role In Opioid Epidemic

June 7, 2016
The six New England governors met to discuss strategies to deal with the opioid addiction problem in all their states. (Michael Dwyer/AP)

Six governors from around New England gathered at Harvard Medical School to discuss the opioid epidemic.

Brock Turner, And What We Talk About When We Talk To Our Kids About Rape

June 7, 2016

We need to teach our daughters and our sons that consent is sacrosanct. That there are consequences to violating it.

A Personal Perspective On Knee Replacement Surgery, As Demand For Procedure Surges

June 6, 2016
Total knee replacement surgery is one of the most common operations performed in the U.S. For aging baby boomers, it's number one. WBUR's Bruce Gellerman was extremely bow-legged, and arthritis made it worse. He decided to get both of his knees replaced when he could no longer ride his bike. (Joe Difazio for WBUR)

Total knee replacement surgery is one of the most common operations performed in the U.S. WBUR’s Bruce Gellerman takes us into the operating room as he gets a new right knee.

Federal, Local Officials Gather In Boston To Discuss Fentanyl Crisis

June 3, 2016
Senator-elect Ed Markey gives a thumbs-up while speaking at the Massachusetts state Democratic Convention in Lowell, Mass., Saturday, July 13, 2013. (AP)

A medical examiner confirmed that pop music icon Prince died from an accidental overdose of fentanyl.

Massachusetts Town Reflects On Year Of Treating, Not Arresting, Opioid Addicts

June 3, 2016
Gloucester Police Chief Leonard Campanello is pictured in Gloucester, Massachusetts, on July 10, 2015. Gloucester is taking a novel approach to the war on drugs, making the police station a first stop for addicts on the road to recovery. Addicts can turn in their drugs to police, no questions asked, and officers, volunteers and trained clinicians help connect them with detox and treatment services. (Elise Amendola/AP)

More than 100 police departments around the country have started similar programs.

In Texas, Women’s Access To Health Care Could Hurt Efforts To Deal With Zika

June 3, 2016
With all of the diseases that mosquitoes carry, why not eradicate them? British researcher Dr. Philip McCall explains why it's not that simple. (turkletom/Flickr)

State health officials have been charged with creating “a clear and concise plan” for dealing with a possible outbreak.

Too Many Dead: The Need To Reframe Gun Violence As A Public Health Issue

June 3, 2016

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has not been allowed to collect data on gun violence in America. The dean of the Boston University School of Public Health hopes that’s about to change.

‘Our Bodies, Ourselves’ Marches On, Into The 21st Century

June 2, 2016
Our Bodies Ourselves executive director Julie Childers (left) and co-founder Judy Norsigian (middle) stand with Here & Now co-host Robin Young in the Here & Now stuidos. (Eileen Bolinsky/Here & Now)

The book “Our Bodies, Ourselves” has become an invaluable source of information about women’s sexual and reproductive health.

CommonHealth: Guideline Changes And Controversy Over Aspirin-A-Day Regimens

June 2, 2016

Many doctors are questioning whether taking a daily aspirin is really worth the risks.

Gloucester Police Mark 1 Year Since Launch Of ‘Angel Program’ To Combat Opioid Crisis

June 2, 2016
Gloucester Police Chief Leonard Campanello last year as the program started. (Elise Amendola/AP)

It’s been one year since the launch of the Gloucester Police Department’s “Angel program,” which grants amnesty to those struggling with opioid addiction who seek police help getting into treatment. Here’s how things went.

A Syllabus For Empathy — Or Why Health Care Workers Should Read Poetry

June 2, 2016

A doctor reflects on the power of poetry to help better understand a patient’s struggles.

Searching For An Alternative Brain Cancer Cure While Fighting The FDA

June 1, 2016
A scientist examining cells in a 96-well plate. These plates allow scientists to look at lots of cells at the same time and directly compare cells that have or have not been treated with a drug. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images/Cancer Research UK)

Neil Fachon found an experimental brain cancer therapy being offered in Texas. But just one day into treatment, the FDA ordered it to stop.

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